Goklany optimistic on climate change

In: Uncategorized

11 Mar 2009

The ever astute Indur Goklany made what sounds like a fascinating speech to the International Conference on Climate Change in New York, judging by a report in Reason by Ronald Bailey (for my January 2007 interview with Goklany see the My Reviews section on the left hand site of the homepage). Evidently Goklany used data from, among others, the World Health Organization (WHO ) and the Intergovermental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to show that the world looks like getting better in many respects even on highly pessimistic assumptions:

“From the Stern Review, Goklany took the worst case scenario, where man-made global warming produces market and non-market losses equal to 35 percent of the benefits that are projected to exist in the absence of climate change by 2200. What did he find? Even assuming the worst emissions scenario, incomes for both developed and developing countries still rise spectacularly. In 1990, average incomes in developing countries stood around $1,000 per capita and at aroud $14,000 in developed countries. Assuming the worst means that average incomes in developing countries would rise in 2100 to $62,000 and in developed countries to $99,000. By 2200, average incomes would rise to $86,000 and $139,000 in developing and developed countries, respectively. In other words, the warmest world turns out to be the richest world.

“Looking at WHO numbers, one finds that the percentage of deaths attributed to climate change now is 13th on the list of causes of mortality, standing at about 200,000 per year, or 0.3 percent of all deaths. High blood pressure is first on the list, accounting for 7 million (12 percent) of deaths; high cholesterol is second at 4.4 million; and hunger is third. Clearly, climate change is not the most important public health problem today. But what about the future? Again looking at just the worst case of warming, climate change would boost the number of deaths in 2085 by 237,000 above what they would otherwise be according to the fast track analyses. Many of the authors of the fast track analyses also co-authored the IPCC’s socioeconomic impact assessments.

“Various environmental indicators would also improve. For example, 11.6 percent of the world’s land was used for growing crops in 1990. In the warmest world, agricultural productivity is projected to increase so much that the amount of land used for crops would drop to just 5 percent by 2100, leaving more land for nature. In other words, if these official projections are correct, man-made global warming is by no means the most important problem faced by humanity.”